Dad dot info
DAD.info form. Ask questions, get answers

GCSE results … 9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1?

b2ap3_thumbnail_pay-2662758_1920.jpg

Results Day

GCSE exam results day is this Thursday (August 22nd) and by mid-morning our teens will know their results and whether they have made those all-important grades.

Reformed GCSEs

This is only the third year of reformed GCSEs in England so if you are still a bit confused here is an explanation of what your child’s grades mean.

• Reformed GCSEs contain more challenging content but they are still designed for the same range of students as in previous years.

• Reformed GCSEs are linear (no modules), so students will have taken all their exams this summer.

9 is the top grade

• GCSE’s are now awarded by number. The top grade is 9 the bottom is 1. The government are classifying Grade 5 as a good pass. To help you on the day an old A is (sort of) equivalent to a 7, a C is a 4 and a G is a 1. Make sure you prime Grandparents with this info so they can react appropriately to your kids news!

• Getting a grade 9 is rarer than getting an A* in previous years. That is deliberate. There are now three top grades (9, 8 and 7) where previously there were only two (A* and A), so if your kid gets a 9 that is really incredible. If they get grade 5s and above it is time to celebrate.

Here is an animation from AQA explaining

Be there for your kids

Don’t forget whatever grades your child gets this is only one stage on their learning journey. If you possibly can, go with your kids to school to get the results. They may well want to just go with their mates, but if they miss out on their grades they will be upset and need you. So, maybe just give them a lift and be about, just in case.

b2ap3_thumbnail_eye-1553789_1920.jpg

Social Media

Although it might be tempting, if your child has done well, to do a shout out on social media remember that your kids classmates will see your post. If they haven’t quite made their grades, having their feeds filled with boasting parents, can be unbearable pressure. So maybe keep your celebrations offline.

Help! My kids grades aren’t great

Tell them you are proud of them whatever grades they got. If they did their best that is good enough for you. If they are slow to share their results with you, that is normal (especially if the result isn’t what they wanted). If they are horrible to you, that is normal too, they are hurting, they don’t hate you! Let them take their time, don’t pester to know the details. Once you do know their results take some time to think through options. There are lots of them… even if your child is going to take a different route to the one you have planned. Resits, apprenticeships, volunteering, a different college. Don’t rule anything out, explore options. Most importantly don’t compare grades between your children.

Good luck on Thursday.

Related entries

How to prepare for your kids’ GCSE results

How to prepare for your kids’ GCSE results

So when the schools closure was announced I felt a mixture of emotions, writes Ian Soars.   For my daughters it was unalloyed joy of course. That is until the eldest realised that the braces she was due to have removed in March would be staying! (poor love only...

Are Your Teenagers Getting Stressed Out by Exams?

Are Your Teenagers Getting Stressed Out by Exams?

Exam season is on us again! Watching your child sweat over exams can stress out the whole family so Dad.info asked Fegans’ Counsellor Vicky Bellman for her top parenting tips for helping with exam-related stress:     1. Keep It In Perspective Exams are...

Latest entries

Your Guide to the European Championships

Your Guide to the European Championships

Like it or loathe it, the next few weeks are going to be all about football. If you want the basics to keep up with your footy crazy kids we’ve compiled this handy guide to give you an overview of the upcoming European Championships. UEFA.com What are the European...

ASK DEBBIE- I AM A DAD WITH 50/50 SHARED CARE

ASK DEBBIE- I AM A DAD WITH 50/50 SHARED CARE

Dads, do you struggle sometimes? Who do you reach out to for help? Debbie Pattison, a qualified counsellor at Fegans can answer your questions. Send them in to Ask Debbie at info@dad.info and if she can she will answer. Today’s question is from a dad who shares care...

Pin It on Pinterest