Dad dot info
Free online course for separated parents
Forum - Ask questions. Get answers.
Free online course for separated parents
DAD.info | Family | Health | Your health | Smoking, drinking or drug-taking? Where to get help to stop

Smoking, drinking or drug-taking? Where to get help to stop

mattz118

mattz118

If you smoke, drink to excess or take drugs, you probably know the effect it’s having on your body. And it’s going to impact on your baby too. Giving up might not be easy, but it’s by far the best option for you and your child.

If you’re worried about how your addiction might affect your children, it’s time to start talking to some of the organisations and support networks that can help you give up.

Smoking

If you want help in giving up smoking:

  • The NHS has a free Go Smokefree helpline on 0800 1690169. The line is open seven days a week, 7am to 11pm, and offers advice on how to give up. It can also refer you to a local self-help group.
  • The charity Quit offers a similar, free helpline on 0800 002200. The line is open from 9am to 9pm each day.
  • If you are about to have a baby and want to quit smoking, the NHS runs a daily 12-noon to 9pm ‘Pregnancy Smoking Helpline’ on 0800 1699169
  • For more details on NHS stop-smoking services see www.givingupsmoking.co.uk.
  • For more information on the impact of smoking on you or your children, see the NHS website or Action on Smoking and Health (ASH)

Body matters

Drinking

If you think you might have a drink problem and want to find out more, or want advice on how to cut down:

  • a good place to start is Netdoctor
  • your GP or local health trust can refer you to an alcohol advice centre or clinic where you can discuss your problem
  • your GP could prescribe the drug ‘Antabuse’, which helps drinkers avoid drinking, although it does not remove the craving. If you drink after taking Antabuse, you’ll experience symptoms such as headaches and nausea, but the drug does not help everyone and it can lead to more serious side-effects

NOTE: specialist alcohol detoxification facilities are rare in the NHS and it is unusual for the NHS to fund placements in private facilities. 

Top tips for staying in shape  

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the world’s biggest union of voluntary, self-help groups for people with alcohol problems.

If you join, you will meet people who have similar problems and the only requirement is an honest desire to stop drinking.

The therapy takes place without the presence of professionals, such as doctors or psychologists.

The AA’s national helpline is 0845 769 7555, or visit Alcoholics Anonymous for further information.

Drugs

  • The organisation FRANK has a free, 24-hour helpline on 0800 776600 for anyone facing problems with drugs.
  • FRANK can also refer you to services in your area, and its A-Z of drugs advice offers information on every drug available. See FRANK’s website for more details.
  • The national charity DrugWise offers expertise on drugs and advice about where to find help in your area.
  • For the NHS’s advice on drugs use and where to find help, see the NHS website

Narcotics Anonymous

Narcotics Anonymous is a self-help network for people who want help to overcome their drugs problems. They describe themselves as “recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean”.

They can be phoned (at local call rates) on 0845 FREEDOM and 0845 7730 0009. The network also offers online meetings three nights a week in addition to their local groups.

Visit www.ukna.org for further information.

Related entries

Prostate problems: what you need to know

Prostate problems: what you need to know

As it's Men's Mental Health Month (Movember) in November, Dad Info is focussing on awareness of men's health issues. As part of this series we are focussing on prostate problems. What is a prostate? The prostate is a small tube found only in men, surrounding the tube...

Why mental health should be your first priority

Why mental health should be your first priority

As dads it can be tempting to compartmentalise feelings and try to plough on. There are many demands on men, both at work and at home, and the days are full. People depend on you. People need you to show up and carry on- or, at least, that can be the perception....

Latest entries

Family tensions at Christmas: a survival guide

Family tensions at Christmas: a survival guide

The image peddled by adverts of happy families sitting around a Christmas table together is not the norm for many people. The festive season can bring up emotions and frustrations between family members, and for those being confronted with awkward reunions, it can...

Help! My child has realised Santa doesn’t exist!

Help! My child has realised Santa doesn’t exist!

He figured it out on his own. He's nobody's fool. First he figured out the Tooth Fairy wasn't real ('It's you putting the money under my pillow, isn't it, Mummy?'), and then he realised that if the Tooth Fairy is actually Mummy, Father Christmas probably doesn't exist...

Eating together is important- for both you and your kids

Eating together is important- for both you and your kids

As busy parents it can be tempting to shovel our food down Homer Simpson-style, while the kids watch a cartoon. With our daily lives so busy, it can feel like too much effort to sit down to eat together. However, research is coming to light that shows why eating meals...

Pin It on Pinterest