Dad dot info
DAD.info form. Ask questions, get answers

$#!!%£*!!!

<a href="https://www.dad.info/" target="_blank">DAD.info</a>

DAD.info

03 Sep 2013

“You’re a poo poo,” said Meri, my three year old, with an impish grin on her face. She knew she was being naughty and was looking for my reaction.

I thought about it for a little while and decided to ignore it.

A few days later, I came downstairs from the loft where I had been wrestling with a computer that had spent the last three days crashing, to find my family sitting around the breakfast table. Clare looked at me with narrowed eyes.

“She keeps saying the P-P word,” she said.

“Yes, I know, it started a few days ago.” I replied. “She’s probably learnt it from nursery. It’s her first attempt at a naughty word.”

“Well, she shouldn’t say it. I’m going to put my foot down.” Clare was adamant.

“I’ve been ignoring it. I figure that if we make a thing of it, it’ll only encourage her. She knows she’s doing something forbidden and the thrill of it will soon wear off.”

“Well, I’ve told her not to. I wasn’t allowed to swear at all growing up in my household.” Clare responded.

“What went wrong?” I asked smirking, making mischief.

Clare’s eyes narrowed yet further. She thought about swearing at me but thought better of it.

To come clean, neither Clare or I are strangers to the odd profanity now and again. Furthermore, I must confess that I have sworn (in rare moments of extreme stress and frustration) in front of the children. However, we have a golden rule that we never, ever swear at the children.

“We need to agree an approach and be consistent. Let’s talk about it and figure out what we do. I agree, we don’t want her wandering around saying ‘P-P’ at every opportunity.”

Meri, who had been listening intently to every word Clare and I said looked at us both with a very familiar naught little grin on her face.

“I need a poo poo,” she said.

 

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the blogger and do not necessarily represent the views of Dad.info.

 

Related entries

Too old for this

Too old for this

It was late on a Thursday evening and Rodger and I were walking up Upper Street in Islington, looking for a Thai restaurant. We were a little worse for wear   “You OK?” he asked looking at my awkward gait. “Yeah,” I said with that little inflection that indicated...

The big day

The big day

I could hear the rustling from the room next-door and glanced at my watch: 6:30 am. I groaned to myself but there was a certain inevitability about it   The kids bounded into our room moments later. “Is Uncle Steve here? Is he here?” They asked excitedly. “Yes,...

The big questions

The big questions

I was walking home from school with my five year old daughter. As we approached our front door she looked up at me   “Daddy?” she asked in that tone of voice that all dads will recognise as a precursor to something that they’ve been pondering. “Yes?” I answered...

Latest entries

Has Lockdown Hurt Your Pre-Schooler?

Has Lockdown Hurt Your Pre-Schooler?

4-year-olds have regressed eight months during UK lockdowns. Who would have believed we could survive a year with... No school. No clubs. No childcare. No grandparents. Not even a poxy toddler group to give me much needed backup. I have spent sleepless nights worrying...

Second Child Survival Kit

Second Child Survival Kit

You had your world turned upside down by your first child. You are battle scarred, sleep deprived and now expecting number two. Your days of lazy lie-ins and freedom are distant memories, but your life is also very full with the joy your child brings. The news of...

How to help an anxious child

How to help an anxious child

The current world is an uncertain one for our kids. Lockdown has left them off school, educated by frazzled parents, separated from their friends, unable to enjoy their usual activities and in many cases struggling to sleep. Our children are aware of a threat they...

Pin It on Pinterest