DAD.info
Free online course for separated parents
Forum - Ask questions. Get answers.
Free online course for separated parents

Eclipse

I turned the angle poise lamp on in my daughter’s bedroom. She looked at me intently. I had a miniature globe and half a cake in my hands.

“So, Meri,” I said. “The lamp is the sun. This globe is the earth and this round cake is the moon. What happens is that the earth goes around the sun and the moon goes around the earth.”

I tried cack-handedly to rotate the cake around the globe whilst moving the globe around the lamp.

 

“Sometimes, the moon comes in between the earth and the sun. When that happens, you get a shadow on the earth and that means that you can’t see the sun any more. That’s what an eclipse is and that is what is happening this Friday.” I looked at five year old Meri to see if she had understood what her fool of a father was prattling on about now.

Friday morning duly arrived and we set off for school. Parents were gathering excitedly in the school playground. The school had invited parents in to watch the eclipse with their children. There was a definite buzz in the playground and not from the children.

By around 9am we could clearly see a chunk of the sun was missing. Meri hopped excitedly next to me.

“It’s going, daddy, you can see it going.” She pointed at the sun.

“Do you know why that is Meri?” I asked, testing to see if any of my attempts at educating her had been successful.

“It’s because the moon comes in front of the sun!” she said excitedly.

“No,” I said, seeing an opportunity to goof around. “It’s because the chariot that carries the sun across the sky has had an accident.”

“Daddy!” she berated me. “You’re so silly!”

As we watched the sun became a golden sliver in the sky. The light dropped and took on a grey, purple hue. My hands felt cold. I tucked them into my pockets. I realised I could see my breath.

I looked at Meri: she was enraptured. The majesty and enormity of what she was witnessing writ large upon her face.

Life is full of special moments. There is little that can beat an eclipse. Indeed, I think there is only one thing better than watching an eclipse: watching your children watch an eclipse. An incredible experience enhanced and magnified by the simple virtue that you are a father.

After the sun started to re-establish control over the wayward moon, I pulled Meri to me.

“You realise Meri, that the next time you’ll see a total eclipse you’ll be 76 years old. Maybe you’ll watch it with your children and grandchildren.”

I paused, poignant and emotional. “Maybe when you watch it, you’ll spare a moment and think of me.”

 

 

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the blogger and do not necessarily represent the views of Dad.info

Related entries

Too old for this

Too old for this

It was late on a Thursday evening and Rodger and I were walking up Upper Street in Islington, looking for a Thai restaurant. We were a little worse for wear   “You OK?” he asked looking at my awkward gait. “Yeah,” I said with that little inflection that indicated...

Too old for this

The big day

I could hear the rustling from the room next-door and glanced at my watch: 6:30 am. I groaned to myself but there was a certain inevitability about it   The kids bounded into our room moments later. “Is Uncle Steve here? Is he here?” They asked excitedly. “Yes,...

Too old for this

The big questions

I was walking home from school with my five year old daughter. As we approached our front door she looked up at me   “Daddy?” she asked in that tone of voice that all dads will recognise as a precursor to something that they’ve been pondering. “Yes?” I answered...

Latest entries

One on one time with children- the benefits

One on one time with children- the benefits

When it comes to building a deeper bond, you can't beat one on one time with children. There are a number of great benefits not only for your relationship but also for your child's wellbeing and confidence. What is one on one time? One on one time is time devoted to...

Parents call for smartphones ban for under 16s

Parents call for smartphones ban for under 16s

MPs are being pushed to consider a smartphones ban under 16s following a number of tragic deaths. The mother of murdered teenager Brianna Ghey, who was killed by two 15 year olds, has asked for both Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer to consider measures to stop children...

How to help children with anxiety

How to help children with anxiety

It can be tricky to know how to help children with anxiety problems- as parents it's difficult to know what to say or do for the best. However, there are a number of tools that you can guide your child to use to fell better, and draw upon to regulate their emotions...

Pin It on Pinterest